The Values That Move us Through Conflict to Understanding –
Discover the Foundations of Spiral Dynamics integral* in Edmonton, July 14-17, 2011.

Why do people make such different decisions, given the same information and opportunities? How do
values develop and spread among people? How can we bring our diverse ways of thinking to create a
community that feels good to all of us? How can we make our way through conflict constructively in the
workplace and in our communities?

Over the years I have found that, Spiral Dynamics integral (SDi) is a model for people who think about complex systems –
neighbourhoods, communities, corporations and organizations. It is a way of understanding the
different values or “world views” that people use to make their decisions. Using SDi, leaders can
reduce the tensions in those differences, and create positive change in social and business
systems.

Based on the research of Clare Graves, Don Beck and Ken Wilber, this 3 day course reveals a
complex adaptive model for leadership, team, organizational and community development. You will
explore value conflicts with the intention of seeing opportunities move forward concretely.
SDi offers you tools to:
• Communicate with, and motivate, people in ways that matter to them.
• Construct organizations and relationships that align with the work to be done, the people
who will be doing it, the management that fits those people and the technologies that apply
naturally.
• Weave people, purpose, priorities, profits, programs and processes to bring about change
that is ecologically informed and operationally integrated.
• Discover the origins, foundations and common tributaries that generate human value
systems over time.
• Learn how human values show up and connect individuals, teams, organizations,
communities, regions, countries and the globe.
• Explore the themes generated by value systems in human history and current affairs, and
how they inform our choices in todayʼs complexities.
• See how value systems contribute to the quality and health of our communities,
governments, health institutions, education systems, economic agreements, financial
institutions, production processes, and leadership codes.
• Explore how value systems affect our perceptions, choices, decisions and relationships.

Who attends SDi learning events?
• environmental leaders
• change managers
• city managers
• technology leaders
• health care leaders
• social service leaders
• community leaders
• HR and OD practitioners
• community developers
• entrepreneurs for the 21st C
• university presidents, faculty and admin
• senior leaders in finance, economics
• senior government leaders
• manufacturers
• coaches, mentors
• young president organizations
• resource management leaders
• community planners
• analysts, strategists
• education and learning leaders
• board members

Instructors
Marilyn Hamilton PhD CGA, is the founder of Integral City Meshworks Inc. She supports teams,
projects, and organizations across Canada to chart new directions and strategies for themselves
and their communities. Marilyn is a researcher, facilitator, teacher, writer and blogger. Marilyn
serves as faculty at Royal Roads University, the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser
University, JFK University, The Banff Centre, California Institute of Integral Studies and the Adizes
Graduate School.
Marilyn applies Spiral Dynamics and Integral tools across Canada and internationally by serving
executives of multinational companies, as community foundation president, chamber of commerce
president, designer of sustainable community development programs and as the developer of
Integral Vital Signs Monitor for City Wellbeing. Marilyn is the Canadian leader of Spiral Dynamics in
the Integral Age, a charter member of the Integral Institute, and represents Canada at the Center for
Human Emergence International. She is author of Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the
Human Hive, and a jury member of the Globe Sustainable City Awards. Marilyn is a co-founder of
the Center for Human Emergence: Canada

Beth Sanders BA MCP MCIP RPP, is the founder and President of POPULUS Community
Planning Inc., where she is engaged by individuals, communities, corporations and organizations
seeking to align people, purpose, priorities, profits, programs and processes. As a city planner,
Beth is regularly in the heart of conflict and political wrangling, ranging from siting hog farms or
homeless shelters, to the chaos of building North Americaʼs fastest growing city: Fort McMurray.
Beth applies Spiral Dynamics and Integral tools across Canada with elected officials and municipal
administrators, public and private corporations, a universityʼs board of governors, numerous
community boards, as faculty at the University of Alberta and Brandon University, on the board of
the Community Planning Association of Alberta, and as a convener of tough conversations that lead
to wise action. She received the Mayorʼs Medal in Urban Issues (Winnipeg) for her work in public
engagement. Beth is president of the Alberta Professional Planners Institute and a co-founder of
the Center for Human Emergence: Canada.

For Details and Registration
Full course details and online registration:
http://integralcity.com/discovery-zone/workshops-and-training_current%20trainings.html

*Accredited by Dr. Don Beck, Founder of the Center for Human Emergence and The Spiral Dynamics Group

By | 2017-04-07T02:57:37+00:00 June 20th, 2011|Classroom course, F. Training|1 Comment

About the Author:

HI I am the Founder of Integral City Meshworks Inc. and Chief Blogger. Working with cities and eco-regions, I ‘meshwork’ or weave people, purpose, priorities, profits, programs and processes to align contexts, grow capacity and develop strategies for sustainability and resilience in the Integral City. You can read more details about me here http://integralcity.com/about/about-the-founder/

One Comment

  1. Beth June 21, 2011 at 7:49 pm - Reply

    Thanks for posting this, Marilyn. I so look forward to meeting the nifty folks that will join us in July, in Edmonton.

    Yours in the field,
    Beth

Leave A Comment